Sunday, November 26, 2017

Clouds

Embracing leaves shivering in the breeze cold trees

Tuesday, November 21, 2017

No-Bake Avalanche Cookies



With love from our simple kitchen to yours. 

RECIPE AT THE BOTTOM

Do you  love TSRI?  Don't miss another recipe.  Click here to Subscribe to The Slow Roasted Italian by Email and receive new recipes in your inbox every day!


Don't miss a thing! Follow us on Facebook | Twitter | Pinterest | Instagram❤ 


http://theslowroasteditalian-printablerecipe.blogspot.com/2016/12/no-bake-avalanche-cookies.html


Check out some of our favorite fabulous desserts:  Click on the image or the bold recipe title and it will open each one in a new tab.

Crockpot Candy is the easiest and most impressive homemade candy ever.  A rich chocolaty, peanutty 4-ingredient recipe that you simply toss in the slow cooker, stir a few times and scoop it out. It doesn't get much easier than that!

http://www.theslowroasteditalian.com/2016/09/reeses-peanut-butter-fudge-recipe.html

Reese's Peanut Butter Fudge is luscious and creamy, made with chunks of peanuts throughout the fudge to give it the perfect crunch. This Reese's Peanut Butter Fudge is a simple recipe with just 4-ingredients! It comes together in just 10 minutes.
http://www.theslowroasteditalian.com/2015/12/crockpot-turtles-candy-recipe.html

Crockpot Turtles Candy is an incredibly simple and impressive candy. A rich chocolaty recipe with perfectly roasted pecans and creamy caramel that you simply dump ingredients into your slow cooker, stir and scoop. Then garnish and gift (or serve).  It doesn't get much easier than that!

=================================================================
No-Bake Avalanche CookiesMAKES 18 LARGE COOKIES
1/2 cup mini chocolate chips
16 ounces vanilla-flavored candy coating (Almond Bark or CandiQuik)
1 (15-ounce) jar creamy peanut butter
2 cups Rice Krispies cereal
1 1/2 cups mini marshmallows

Prepare 2 cookie sheets with a Silpat mat or parchment paper. Set aside.

Place chocolate chips in the freezer, until ready to use.

Melt Almond Bark in a heat safe bowl, microwave at half power for 30 seconds at a time until melted and smooth. Meanwhile: Add rice krispies to a large bowl. Set aside.

Add peanut butter to Almond Bark. Stir to combine. Pour vanilla candy mixture over rice krispies. Stir until combined. Allow mixture to cool to room temperature (or until barely warm). Add marshmallows. Mix until combined. Add frozen chocolate chips. Stir to combine.

Use a 2 tablespoon scoop to portion treats onto prepared cookie sheet. Allow to set in a cool place, until firm. You can pop them in the fridge if your kitchen is too warm.

Serve and enjoy!

Sometimes by David Whyte


Sometimes  if you move carefully through the forest,
breathing like the ones in the old stories,
who could cross a shimmering bed of leaves without a sound,
you come to a place whose only task
is to trouble you with tiny but frightening requests,
conceived out of nowhere but in this place beginning to lead everywhere.
Requests to stop what you are doing right now, and
to stop what you are becoming while you do it,
questions that can make or unmake a life,
questions that have patiently waited for you,
questions that have no right to go away.
                                                                  David Whyte  from Everything is Waiting for You

Saturday, November 18, 2017

Song for Autumn by Mary Oliver

Song for Autumn

6786303-A-stack-of-firewood-covered-in-snow--Stock-PhotoBy Mary Oliver
 
In the deep fall
don’t you imagine the leaves think how
comfortable it will be to touch
the earth instead of the
nothingness of air and the endless
freshets of wind? And don’t you think
the trees themselves, especially those with mossy,
warm caves, begin to think
 
of the birds that will come — six, a dozen — to sleep
inside their bodies? And don’t you hear
the goldenrod whispering goodbye,
the everlasting being crowned with the first
tuffets of snow? The pond
vanishes, and the white field over which
the fox runs so quickly brings out
its blue shadows. And the wind pumps its
bellows. And at evening especially,
the piled firewood shifts a little,
longing to be on its way.

Tuesday, October 17, 2017

To Autumn by John Keats



To Autumn

Season of mists and mellow fruitfulness,
Close bosom-friend of the maturing sun;
Conspiring with him how to load and bless
With fruit the vines that round the thatch-eaves run;
To bend with apples the moss'd cottage-trees,
And fill all fruit with ripeness to the core;
To swell the gourd, and plump the hazel shells
With a sweet kernel; to set budding more,
And still more, later flowers for the bees,
Until they think warm days will never cease,
For Summer has o'er-brimm'd their clammy cells.
Who hath not seen thee oft amid thy store?
Sometimes whoever seeks abroad may find
Thee sitting careless on a granary floor,
Thy hair soft-lifted by the winnowing wind;
Or on a half-reap'd furrow sound asleep,
Drows'd with the fume of poppies, while thy hook
Spares the next swath and all its twinéd flowers:
And sometimes like a gleaner thou dost keep
Steady thy laden head across a brook;
Or by a cyder-press, with patient look,
Thou watchest the last oozings hours by hours.
Where are the songs of Spring? Ay, where are they?
Think not of them, thou hast thy music too,—
While barréd clouds bloom the soft-dying day,
And touch the stubble-plains with rosy hue;
Then in a wailful choir the small gnats mourn
Among the river sallows, borne aloft
Or sinking as the light wind lives or dies;
And full-grown lambs loud bleat from hilly bourn;
Hedge-crickets sing; and now with treble soft
The red-breast whistles from a garden-croft;
And gathering swallows twitter in the skies.

Monday, October 02, 2017

Enough by David Whyte

Enough
Enough. These few words are enough.
If not these words, this breath.
If not this breath, this sitting here.
This opening to the life
we have refused
again and again
until now.
Until now
by David Whyte, from the book Where Many Rivers Meet
2

Where Wild Things Live by Wendell Berry

When despair for the world grows in me and I wake in the night at the least sound in fear of what my life and my children's lives may be, I go and lie down where the wood drake rests in his beauty on the water, and the great heron feeds. I come into the peace of wild things who do not tax their lives with forethought of grief. I come into the presence of still water. And I feel above me the day-blind stars waiting with their light. For a time I rest in the grace of the world, and am free.

© Wendell Berry. This poem is excerpted from “The Selected Poems of Wendell Berry” a

Kindness by Naomi Shihab Nye


Kindness

Before you know what kindness really is
you must lose things,
feel the future dissolve in a moment
like salt in a weakened broth.
What you held in your hand,
what you counted and carefully saved,
all this must go so you know
how desolate the landscape can be
between the regions of kindness.
How you ride and ride
thinking the bus will never stop,
the passengers eating maize and chicken
will stare out the window forever.

Before you learn the tender gravity of kindness
you must travel where the Indian in a white poncho
lies dead by the side of the road.
You must see how this could be you,
how he too was someone
who journeyed through the night with plans
and the simple breath that kept him alive.

Before you know kindness as the deepest thing inside,
you must know sorrow as the other deepest thing. 
You must wake up with sorrow.
You must speak to it till your voice
catches the thread of all sorrows
and you see the size of the cloth.
Then it is only kindness that makes sense anymore,
only kindness that ties your shoes
and sends you out into the day to gaze at bread,
only kindness that raises its head
from the crowd of the world to say
It is I you have been looking for,
and then goes with you everywhere
like a shadow or a friend.
 
 
From Words Under the Words: Selected Poems. Copyright © 1995 by Naomi Shihab Nye.